Make Bradford British is a major two-part series exploring what it means to be British.

In a speech last year Prime Minister David Cameron said that ‘state multiculturalism' has failed. Across Britain, cities are becoming increasingly divided, with people living side-by-side – but not mixing. The Yorkshire city of Bradford is multicultural. It is also segregated with a city centre that is now predominantly Asian surrounded by almost exclusively white suburbs.

Make Bradford British brings together people of different races and backgrounds for the first time, to see if they can come up with a common notion of the thread that binds them all together – what it means to be British.

The first episode airs on Thursday 1st March at 9pm with the second and concluding part on Thursday 8th March at 9pm

To define what it means to be British the series begins with the Government's own UK Citizenship Test, the Life in the UK Test. Over 100 people from across Bradford, all British citizens, are invited to sit the test, whose questions include What percentage of the British population is under the age of 19? When were women given the right to vote?

Eight people who fail the test are then invited to live together in a microcosm of multicultural society. After debating what being a British citizen means, from exploring use of language through to accommodating religious and dietary requirements, they'll experience a side of life in Great Britain they've never seen before.

In pairs, the eight residents of Bradford, ranging from a pub-landlady to a former-magistrate, will live each other's lives. From visiting a mosque for the first time, to experiencing a traditional dinner party, each person opens their eyes to the world that exists around them, right on their doorstep. Can eight people from different worlds but the same city really define what it means to be British in 2012?

Two diversity and community experts, Taiba Yasseen and Laurie Trott, help guide the eight through the experience, to see if, by uniting people within the city, they can create a blueprint for a genuinely multicultural Great Britain.

(more…)